Patriotic Parents Pull Kids from School over Presidential Address

In the wake of news that the President of the United States will deliver a speech urging government control of medicine, a growing number of parents are planning to pull their children from government-controlled schools on Tuesday, September 8, when the President delivers another speech. The White House announced some time ago that President Barack Obama’s address to primary education students would be carried live to the nation’s government schools, with government-established lesson plans, one of which originally assigned students to “write letters to themselves about what they can do to help the president.” Obama’s speech will be shown live on the White House Web site and on C-SPAN at noon ET on Sept. 8.

Not to my kids, many Americans are saying.

“Districts in states including Texas, Illinois, Minnesota, Missouri, Virginia, Wisconsin have decided not to show the speech to students. Others are still thinking it over or are letting parents have their kids opt out,” Associated Press (AP) reports. Government school districts are apparently responding to the opposition. A district near Houston, Texas, plans to show the American president’s speech but, in the words of its spokeswoman, “we would not force them to listen.”

Gee, thanks. This is another example of the Obama administration’s determination to use every available means to indoctrinate the nation’s youth, as the Bush administration did to promote similar expansion of government controls, and use propaganda. This time, patriotic Americans are speaking up, taking action, and actively opposing the government’s rules.

Good for their kids and good for America. We need such principled acts of opposition to government control of our lives more desperately than ever. In fact, the Republican Party, which is dominated by those who would implement government control for God or Judeo-Christianity, should learn a lesson from the patriotic parents. The Grand Old Party (GOP) would be wise to repudiate its religionism, stand united for inalienable individual rights (which inherently means the right to an abortion), and unanimously walk out of President Obama’s socialized medicine speech to Congress the following night.

Book Reviews: Boys, Quakes and Cooking

Unfortunately, I cannot recommend Michael Gurian’s The Purpose of Boys (Jossey-Bass, $ 26.95), because the author completely endorses the view that the purpose of boys—and presumably girls—is, of course, service to others. Self-denial runs throughout this thoughtful book, which appealed to me because the author, a family therapist, focuses on the development of boys in an often anti-boy culture. Dr. Gurian encourages parents and boys to embrace heroism—a rare advocacy these days. Here, too, Dr. Gurian’s definition falls short of man as a rational and selfish human being. He writes that he advises patients to think of the term HEROIC as an acronym for Honorable, Enterprising, Responsible, Original, Intimate, and Creative. Excellent ideals but check out what he means by being responsible: “a boy who cares about others’ needs, and becomes a man of service.” That means the boy must put others first—and himself last—in service of … whom? What? Why? Dr. Gurian’s right that boys are being seriously neglected. Sacrifice of boys (or girls) is not the cure.

A good beginner’s book for kids who want to understand earthquakes—which we’ve been experiencing here in southern California lately—is Earthquake! ($ 3.99, Aladdin Paperbacks) which is part of Simon & Schuster’s Natural Disasters series. The large print, 32-page edition by Marion Dane Bauer, with color illustrations by John Wallace, is scientific about how the earth moves, with facts about the earth’s movement presented in sequence with the three major types of fault movements. A few pages cover various myths about quakes, correctly described as “made up” stories, and the book includes a note to parents and teachers and sound advice on what to do during a quake. Earthquake! is Level One of the four levels in the publisher’s Ready-to-Read series, which means longer sentences and increased vocabulary for the beginning reader.

The Family Chef ($ 27.95, Celebra) by sisters Jill and Jewels Elmore contains very healthy soup, salad and family meal recipes for adults, babies and kids and it’s a well-organized cookbook for those who seek to replicate the food consumed by shapely actress Jennifer Aniston, who hired them and wrote the Foreword. Short notes are personal, fun, and sometimes educational, though the print is too small so use eyeglasses or contacts while cooking if you wear them. With a table of contents with chapter titles such as “Go, Fish!”, lots of white space and color photographs for each recipe, this is a handy kitchen reference for making relatively simple, light meals (assuming the reader is already familiar with different types of lettuce such as mache, Grenoble, and Parella) in international styles. I like the resources section, which provides addresses, Web sites and telephone numbers for the Elmore ladies’ favorite grocers, utensils and ingredients. Also included in The Family Chef: an index and a listing of their favorite food and cooking books—and movies (No Reservations, Ratatouille, and Lasse Hallstrom’s Chocolat, all highly recommended by me, too, especially Chocolat!)